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Intelligence Analysis Major

Intelligence Analysis Curriculum

Credit Hours Required

 

The program will require all students to complete 51 credit hours of undergraduate coursework for the major in the Intelligence Analysis. This includes 30 credit hours of program core course work, 15 credit hours concentration course work, and 6 credit hours directed electives course work. Each concentration has 15 credit hours of course work. Together with the University’s Foundational Studies requirements, the entire B.S. in Intelligence Analysis program will have 120 credit hours.

 

30 credits Core + 15 credits Concentration + 6 credits Directed Electives

Core Courses (30 credits):

INAN 200 - Introduction to Intelligence Analysis 3 credit hours

INAN 210 - Intelligence and National Security 3 credit hours

INAN 310 - Law Enforcement Intelligence (or Military Intelligence) 3 credit hours

INAN 320 - Strategic Intelligence 3 credit hours

CRIM 315 - Techniques of Criminal Justice Interviewing 3 credit hours

CRIM 396 - Research Methods for Intelligence Analysis 3 credit hours

INAN 400 - Intelligence Applications and Issues 3 credit hours

INAN CRIM 440 - Ethics in Criminal Justice 3 credit hours

INAN 450 - Intelligence Methods and Analysis 3 credit hours

INAN 460 - Intelligence Writing & Presentation 3 credit hours

 

Choose one concentration (15 credits); all courses are 3 credit hours

 

  1. Counterintelligence Concentration
  2. Criminal Intelligence Concentration
  3. Intelligence Operations Concentration
  4. Intelligence Collection Concentration

Counterintelligence Concentration (15 credits)

  1. 240 Counterintelligence 3 credit hours
  2. 321 Foreign Intelligence Organizations 3 credit hours
  3. 322 Military Intelligence 3 credit hours
  4. 323 Signal Intelligence 3 credit hours
  5. 324 Open-Source Intelligence 3 credit hours
  6. 325 Human Intelligence 3 credit hours
  7. 330 Cybercrime 3 credit hours
  8. 331 Cyber security 3 credit hours
  9. 340 Counterintelligence Operations 3 credit hours
  10. 386 Criminal Profiling 3 credit hours
  11. 419 Threats and Risk Assessment 3 credit hours
  12. 451 Geographic Information System I 3 credit hours
  13. 452 Geographic Information System II 3 credit hours

CRIM 416 Symposium on Criminology 3 credit hours

CRIM 498 Internship 3 credit hours

Criminal Intelligence Concentration (15 credits)

  1. 244 Tactical Intelligence 3 credit hours
  2. 324 Open-Source Intelligence 3 credit hours
  3. 323 Signal Intelligence 3 credit hours
  4. 325 Human Intelligence 3 credit hours
  5. 330 Cybercrime 3 credit hours
  6. 350 Crime Analysis 3 credit hours
  7. 386 Criminal Profiling 3 credit hours
  8. 451 Geographic Information System I 3 credit hours
  9. 452 Geographic Information System II 3 credit hours
  10. 470 Intelligence and Narcotics 3 credit hours

CRIM 416 Symposium on Criminology 3 credit hours

CRIM 435 Criminal Investigation 3 credit hours

CRIM 498 Internship 3 credit hours

Intelligence Operations Concentration (15 credits)

  1. 240 Counterintelligence 3 credit hours
  2. 244 Tactical Intelligence 3 credit hours
  3. 321 Foreign Intelligence Organizations 3 credit hours
  4. 324 Open-Source Intelligence 3 credit hours
  5. 323 Signal Intelligence 3 credit hours
  6. 325 Human Intelligence 3 credit hours
  7. 326 Geospatial Intelligence 3 credit hours
  8. 340 Counterintelligence Operations 3 credit hours
  9. 386 Criminal Profiling 3 credit hours
  10. 470 Intelligence and Narcotics 3 credit hours

CRIM 416 Symposium on Criminology 3 credit hours

CRIM 498 Internship 3 credit hours

Intelligence Collection Concentration (15 credits)

  1. 244 Tactical Intelligence 3 credit hours
  2. 324 Open-Source Intelligence 3 credit hours
  3. 323 Signal Intelligence 3 credit hours
  4. 325 Human Intelligence 3 credit hours
  5. 326 Geospatial Intelligence 3 credit hours
  6. 330 Cybercrime 3 credit hours
  7. 331 Cyber security 3 credit hours
  8. 335 Introduction to Computer Forensics 3 credit hours
  9. 340 Counterintelligence Operations 3 credit hours
  10. 350 Crime Analysis 3 credit hours
  11. 386 Criminal Profiling 3 credit hours
  12. 410 Terrorism 3 credit hours
  13. 419 Threats and Risk Assessment 3 credit hours
  14. 451 Geographic Information System I 3 credit hours
  15. 470 Intelligence and Narcotics 3 credit hours

CRIM 416 Symposium on Criminology 3 credit hours

CRIM 435 Criminal Investigation 3 credit hours

CRIM 498 Internship 3 credit hours

Intelligence Directed Electives (6 credits)

  1. 244 Tactical Intelligence 3 credit hours
  2. 321 Foreign Intelligence Organizations 3 credit hours
  3. 322 Military Intelligence 3 credit hours
  4. 326 Geospatial Intelligence 3 credit hours
  5. 330 Cybercrime 3 credit hours
  6. 331 Cyber Security 3 credit hours
  7. 335 Introduction to Computer Forensics 3 credit hours
  8. 340 Counterintelligence Operations 3 credit hours
  9. 350 Crime Analysis 3 credit hours
  10. 386 Criminal Profiling 3 credit hours
  11. 410 Terrorism 3 credit hours
  12. 417 Cyber Threat Analysis 3 credit hours
  13. 418 National Security Policy 3 credit hours
  14. 419 Threats and Risk Assessment 3 credit hours
  15. 451 Geographic Information System I 3 credit hours
  16. 452 Geographic Information System II 3 credit hours
  17. 470 Intelligence and Narcotics 3 credit hours

CRIM 416 Symposium on Criminology 3 credit hours

CRIM 435 Criminal Investigation 3 credit hours

CRIM 498 Internship 3 credit hours

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

This course explores (a) the interviewing and interrogation techniques, (b) legal restrictions on interrogations, and (c) techniques and technology related to the detection of truth and deception. This course also examines the legal and ethical issues of the use of interview and interrogation techniques to acquire intelligence information from suspects and its concomitant impact on criminal prosecutions, veracity of information, and public policy.

INAN 200 Introduction to Intelligence Analysis (3 credits)

This survey course introduces the student to the discipline of intelligence and provides the student with an understanding of how intelligence systems function, how they fit within the policymaking systems of free societies, and how they are managed and controlled. The course will provide a theoretical overview of the intelligence, including psychology of intelligence, types of intelligence methods, tools and techniques, basic writing and briefing skills, basic data management strategies and tools, and various types of intelligence used throughout the public and private sectors.

INAN 210 Intelligence and National Security (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to national security decision-making in the United States with a special emphasis on the role of intelligence in formulating policy. Students will engage in a historical overview of national security politics and strategy since WWII and describe major institutions and processes involved in national security policy-making. The course is designed to survey significant national security problems and their changing nature in the 21st century (e.g., examine relationships and tensions between agencies, government leaders and policymakers). Additionally, this course explores issues of maintaining the balance between the need for intelligence and the civil rights and liberties of the people.

INAN 240 Counterintelligence (3 credits)

Developing a comprehensive knowledge of the use and practices of counterintelligence, especially in protecting homeland security and national security interests against foreign adversaries, is the primary focus of this course. Issues, strategies, and the legal framework that govern counterintelligence activities, as practiced by the U.S. and foreign governments around the globe, are highlighted.

INAN 244 Tactical Intelligence (3 credits)

This course examines the impact of terrain and weather on tactics, employment of multi-discipline intelligence collections, and principles of tactical intelligence analysis form the core of the course. Students develop an appreciation for the limits of process in applying the art of intelligence to deal with tactical problems and how tactical intelligence theory and practice are utilized in support of ground operations.

INAN 310 Law Enforcement Intelligence (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to law enforcement intelligence definitions, agencies, and methodologies of analysis. It reviews the mission and roles of the crime analyst at the local, state and federal levels.

CRIM 315 Techniques of Interviewing and Interrogation (3 credits)

 

This course explores (a) the interviewing and interrogation techniques, (b) legal restrictions on interrogations, and (c) techniques and technology related to the detection of truth and deception. This course also examines the legal and ethical issues of the use of interview and interrogation techniques to acquire intelligence information from suspects and its concomitant impact on criminal prosecutions, veracity of information, and public policy.

INAN 320 Strategic Intelligence (3 credits)

This course is divided into three parallel tracks covering strategic theory, the practice of strategic intelligence, and the application of those principles to “real life” problems. Analysts will participate throughout the course as a member of a group in a large-scale estimative project.

INAN 321 Foreign Intelligence Organizations (3 credits)

This course introduces students to several foreign intelligence organizations that continue to play a significant role in U.S. strategic intelligence, foreign policy, and national security strategy planning. Each country’s organizational structure, their collection methods, operational strengths and weaknesses will be assessed with the objective of evaluating their overall relative effectiveness.

INAN 322 Military Intelligence (3 credits)

This course explores the role of intelligence in the conduct and prosecution of armed conflict. The course traces the evolution of modern military organizations and the use of intelligence in the success or failure of these organizations. Current intelligence practices and methods employed by the US military are also discussed. Additionally, this course covers the principles of Intelligence support for military operations including definitions and problems of strategic, operational and tactical intelligence; various aspects of military operations; and significant past, present and future events, operations and implications involving intelligence and military operations.

INAN 323 Signals Intelligence (3 credits)

 This course focuses on teaching students the process of gathering intelligence through assessment of the communications of individuals from electronic signal transmitting devices (e.g. cell phones, radio waves, satellites, etc.). It also focuses on the types of signal interception and the disruption of those signals.

INAN 324 Open-Source Intelligence (3 credits)

This course focuses on the intelligence that can be gathered from publically available sources of information. This includes information that and be gathered and analyzed from the web-based communities, public data (e.g., government reports, demographics, etc.), the media (e.g., newspapers, magazines, radio, television, etc.), professional and academic records (e.g., papers, conferences, professional associations, published reports, etc.).

INAN 325 Human Intelligence (3 credits)

This course focuses on the intelligence gathered by means of interpersonal contacts (e.g., the collection of information from human sources). It focuses on the intelligence gathered through interviewing witnesses or suspects, and through clandestine or covert means (e.g., espionage).

INAN 326 Geospatial Intelligence (3 credits)

This course focuses on the ability to describe, understand, and interpret geospatial data so as to anticipate the human impact of an event or action within a spatio and temporal environment. Also, it focuses on the ability to identify, collect, store, and manipulate data to create geospatial knowledge through critical thinking, geospatial reasoning, and analytical techniques.

INAN 330 Cybercrime (3 credits)

This course covers a wide range of criminal activities in which computers or computer networks are uses as tools to target individuals, corporations, or government institutions. It covers topics such as electronic crime, information crime, virtual crime, and an overview of cyber weaponry, various offensive and defensive strategies.

INAN 331 Cyber security (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of cyber security, discusses the evaluation of information security into cyber security, and explores the relationship of cyber security to organizations and society. Students will be exposed to multiple cyber security environments, technologies, processes, and concepts, analyze the threats and risks to/in these environments, and understand how to develop appropriate strategies to mitigate potential security impacts in the modern information environment.

INAN 335 Introduction to Computer Forensics (3 credits)

This course focuses on the foundation of computer forensics. It prepares students how to obtain and analyze digital information for possible use as evidence in civil, criminal or administrative cases. Its primary focus is on digital information retrieval methods.

INAN 340 Counterintelligence Operations (3 credits)

This course provides students with an introduction to counterintelligence operations and techniques. Students will study passive and active counterintelligence measures, principles and processes of counterintelligence operations, its relationship to covert action, and the legal and ethical issues involved.

INAN 350 Crime Analysis (3 credits)

This course is designed to enhance the analytical and research skills of those individuals intending careers within the criminal justice system and homeland defense areas. Course objectives include 1) turning police raw data into intelligence, 2) further enhancing critical thinking and communication skills, 3) examining the offender, victim, and situational elements surrounding major forms of crime, and 4) to acquire spatial and temporal analysis skills necessary to conduct research and analytical projects once employed.

INAN 386 Criminal Profiling (3 credits)

This course examines the dynamics of individual criminal acts utilizing inductive and deductive methodology to profile criminal behavior, offender characteristics, crime scene investigation, evidence collection, and case linkage of specific categories of crimes. Topical areas in this course will include homicide, serial crime, stalking, and other criminal behaviors and acts.

INAN 400 Intelligence Applications and Issues (3 credits)

This course focuses on the intelligence applications and issues that surround the contemporary intelligence community. Students will learn a number of information collection and analysis approaches that help decision makers, and issues surrounding those approaches. A significant portion of this course focuses on the applications and issues of assessment of an adversary’s capabilities and vulnerabilities.

INAN 410 Terrorism (3 credits)

This course fosters an understanding of the roots, development, and the impact of contemporary worldwide terrorism, especially in the United States, while using a simulated operational environment. Issues related to the radicalization of citizens, which includes the personal and sociopolitical factors causing radicalization, will be discussed.

INAN 417 Cyber Threat Analysis (3 credits)

This course will introduce students to the methodology of investigation and analysis procedures associated in the application of real world cyber attacks. Students will gain knowledge of key terminology, online tools used by analysts, the development of legislation, key government agency roles, and the nature of cyber threats/attacks.

INAN 418 National Security Policy (3 credits)

This course will focus on U.S. national security and related-policy and the domestic and global factors affecting implementation.

INAN 419 Threats and Risk Assessment (3 credits)

This course examines their political, economic, and social condition which allows an understanding of threats to the state and their vulnerabilities. This course provides students with analytic procedures to assess a state’s military capabilities, strengths and weaknesses of their political and economic systems, and challenges presented by their social systems.

CRIM 435 Criminal Investigation (3 credits)

This course examines the organization and functions of investigative agencies, basic considerations in the investigation of crime, collection and preservation of physical evidence, elements of legal proof in the submission of evidence, and investigation of specific types of offenses. 

CRIM 440 Ethics in Criminal Justice (3 credits)

This course focuses on the ethical responsibilities of different U.S. intelligence community members, the relationship between intelligence and policy-making processes, and legal foundations with particular emphasis on the intersection of national security and civil liberties. Additionally, it covers ethical theories, the role of ethics, protection of individual civil rights, ethical dilemmas posed by several current challenges and ways to make ethics a larger part of the national security dialogue.

INAN 450 Intelligence Methods and Analysis (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the collection and analysis techniques used by entry level analysts. Students work on a term-long project that incorporates data basing, collection planning, organizational and link analysis, and structured analysis techniques. Computer software programs are used to enhance that analytical product. A threaded discussion of the psychology of intelligence analysis is integrated into course material.

INAN 451 Geographic Information Systems I (3 credits)

This course explores tools for data acquisition, management, query and display. This course will provide students first with a substantial foundation in the history of cartography and mapmaking. The second major emphasis of this course will merge both theoretical and historical information with hands-on practical training utilizing the basic tools provided with the GIS software. Students will become familiar with the importance of metadata, editing and updating metadata and how this is important to the success or failure of the dataset as a whole.

INAN 452 Geographic Information Systems II (3 credits)

Using the ArcGIS software, students will be taught how to manipulate datasets based on complex queries in several advanced platforms within the GIS environment including geospatial analyses, creating basic models, interpolation among multiple data points, and advanced data table editing and creation. Students will learn methodologies for determining the presence or absence of patterns and identify associations among different data layers.

INAN 460 Intelligence Writing & Presentation (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of effective intelligence writing and presentation. Emphasis is placed on the variety of forms of intelligence writing, briefing styles, and evaluations of intelligence products for form and substance, and application of numerous advanced analytical techniques.

INAN 470 Intelligence and Narcotics (3 credits)

This course surveys the role of narcotics and the illicit drug trade as risks to national security, international development, and progress. The purpose is to assess both domestic and foreign intelligence gathering and analysis, with an emphasis on counter-narcotics policies and strategies. Students will be able to critically analyze, strategically assess effective intelligence collection, and evaluate the impact of current drug interdiction efforts by federal domestic and international agencies.

CRIM 498 Internship (3-6 credits)

Students engage in a period of employment (minimum of 96 hours for 3 credits) as an intelligence analyst with a government, international agency, or corporation during which certain experience objectives must be met.

 

Department of Criminology & Criminal Justice